Sports and Lifestyle Nutrition

Solutions to help you innovate in the fast-moving market.

Overview

The health and wellness nutrition market is growing fast.

More people are looking for nutrition products to support their focus on a healthy, active lifestyle.  We're here to help you succeed in this ever-changing market with our broad and versatile range of quality ingredients, our history of expertise and an absolute dedication to help you continue innovating.

What's New: Milk Phospholipids to manage the effects of stress

Phospholipids are building blocks of all cell membranes playing important roles in our brain and nervous system. As we age, brain phospholipid levels decline, a condition potentially ameliorated by phospholipid supplementation.

 

Naturally present in milk as part of the milk fat globule membrane, milk phospholipids are complex lipids clinically proven to manage the effects of stress, helping maintain performance by staying focused and positive. Suitable for use as a standalone product, or as an addition to a wide range of food and drink applications.

Ingredients

All

Interested in one of these ingredients?

Resources

Explore the NZMP SureProteinTM range - protein ingredients for wellness solutions

Download our range brochure for a summary of protein ingredients in the SureProteinTM portfolio. You will also learn about:

  • Protein ingredients and their use in different applications
  • Key ingredient advantages in texture, composition, and flavour
  • Different protein, fat and carbohydrate levels in an easy comparison table

Learn from our expert Rachel Marshall as she talks about product innovation in the wellness space.

Join our panel of experts and discover insights on the European nutritional bar market.

How your brand can stand out in the growing United States nutritional bar market.

A diet containing rich amounts of dairy protein can help protect bone health during ageing.

Consuming the required quantity of protein is crucial for rebuilding and toning muscle.

Dairy protein is proven to support benefits of physical activity and can support mobility as we age.

Dairy protein is a high quality, complete protein.

Dairy is nature's ultimate source of protein.

Good nutrition is an important part of enabling people to make the most out of each day.

Dairy protein can help support muscle mass and strength maintenance as we age.

Without feeding muscles before and after exercise, its benefits cannot be fully optimised.

Dairy proteins ability to help support weight management.

Dairy protein is a great way to support weight and muscle management.

NZMP Sports and Active Lifestyle

How probiotics can influence several aspects of digestive health and overall wellbeing.

How probiotics work with the immune system to support health.
 

Understanding how probiotics can influence mental wellbeing via the microbiota-gut-brain axis.

Immunity supporting ingredients

Fundamentals of Immunity 

Weight Management With Protein

Why Your Muscles Need Protein

Dairy: A Natural Source Of Protein

Natural Solutions To Healthy Aging

Protein's Impact on Bone and Muscle Health

What Is Milk Composed Of

What Are Proteins Made Of

Protein Benefits

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Discover more about how SureProtein™ can support consumers. 

  • [1] Influence of phosphatidylserine on cognitive performance and cortical activity after induced stress. Baumeister et al, 2008.
  • [2] Influence of phosphatidylserine on mood and heart rate when faced with an acute stressor. Benton et al, 2001.
  • [3] Effects of soy lecithin phosphatidic acid and phosphatidylserinecomplex (PAS) on the endocrine and psychological responses to mental stress. Hellhammer et al, 2004.
  • [4] Effects of milk-based phospholipids on cognitive performance and subjective responses to psychosocial stress. Boyle et al, 2019.
  • [5] Milk-based phospholipids increase morning cortisol availability and improve memory in chronically stressed men. Schubert et al, 2011.
  • [6] Effects of milk phospholipid on memory and psychological stress response. Hellhammer et al, 2010.